Investigators demonstrate that intermitent preventive treatment in infants is effective against malaria in a non-African setting

Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi) involves the administration of a treatment dose of an antimalarial drug on a predetermined schedule coinciding with routine visits for vaccinations

Ivo MuellerIntermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi), which involves the administration of a treatment dose of an antimalarial drug on a predetermined schedule coinciding with routine visits for vaccinations, has been shown to be an effective strategy for preventing malaria and anaemia in sub-Saharan Africa. However, until now no evidence was available to support its effectiveness in other areas. This trial led by a researcher from the Barcelona Centre for International Health Research (CRESIB), the research arm of ISGlobal, has demonstrated for the first time the safety and efficacy of IPTi in a non-African setting and in an area where malaria is caused by both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, the two most common causative parasites.

Information via: ISGlobal