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A thyroid nodule is a number of thyroid cells that are grouped together in a cluster, a lump, forming a tumour that may be either malignant or benign. More than 95% of thyroid nodules are benign. However, up to 5% are malignant.  

Thyroid nodule explained in first person

Professionals and patients explain how you live with the disease
Fortunately, the prevalence of malignant nodules is very low: only one in 10 nodules will be malignant.

When a person has more than one thyroid nodule it is called a goitre

Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrinological problem in Spain. They may cause no symptoms or they may grow and cause discomfort because of their size, or because they function independently from the rest of the thyroid (toxic nodule). 

How many people are affected by thyroid nodules?

Approximately 1 in 10 people have a thyroid nodule and approximately 9 out of 10 nodules are benign (non-cancerous).  

The most common benign thyroid nodules are colloid nodules, follicular neoplasms, and nodules containing fluid or blood, known as cystic nodules. Nodules that secrete thyroid hormones independently of the rest of the thyroid gland are called autonomous nodules.  

The figures show that, in Spain, the incidence of new thyroid nodules is 0.1% per year and the probability of having at least one thyroid nodule in your lifetime is 10%.  

Información general de Thyroid diseases

Consulta toda la información relacionada con Thyroid diseases

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Substantiated information by:

Felicia Alexandra Hanzu
Mireia Mora Porta

Published: 10 June 2021
Updated: 10 June 2021

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