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Self-harms are those behaviors intentionally aimed at harming the body's surface without a suicidal intention. They are considered a problem when they become repeated behaviours with five o more episodes a day. 

Self-harms in first person

Professionals and patients explain how you live with the disease
Our current approach to this situation is therapy, there are no medications that can change this behaviour. And the therapy that works best is dialectic behavioural therapy. We work tolerance to discomfort; We realize that in life problems occur and forms of communication.

Self-harm or self-injuries are defined as intentional injuries which people inflict on themselves.

The most common forms of self-harm are:

Person cutting his wrist

Cutting

Lip biting

Biting

Pinching the face

Pinching

Self-injury by scratching or cutting wrists

Scratching

Person burning

Burning

Hitting yourself in the face

Hitting

Hitting yourself on the head with a mallet

Head-banging 

Driving a nail into your wrist

Self-embedding objects

Person eating nails

Swallowing objects

People often use different methods to injure themselves.

Self-harm may help to control negative feelings; thus, they sometimes become a "quick fix" to stop feeling bad. The problem is that the relief is only temporary, and when the unpleasant feelings return, the person will harm themselves again. This establishes a cycle which is difficult to break without professional help.

 

How many people are affected by self-harming?

Up to 30% of teenagers have ever self-harmed themselves in their life. In one in 10, on a recurring basis in the last year. It is most common in adolescence but may occur at any stage of life.

Información general de Mental Health in Children and Adolescents

Consulta toda la información relacionada con Mental Health in Children and Adolescents

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Substantiated information by:

Iria Méndez

Published: 30 October 2019
Updated: 30 October 2019

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