Reading time: 2 min
Various diseases and injuries can affect the transparency and shape of the cornea, preventing light from passing through normally and causing impaired vision. Depending on which layer of the cornea is affected, cornea transplant can be: penetrating keratoplasty, deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty or endothelial keratoplasty.

Cornea Transplant explained in first person

Professionals and patients explain how you live with the disease
A reassuring message for patients facing a cornea transplant, because cornea transplantation is very safe: rejection rates are low.

A corneal transplant (or keratoplasty) is a surgical procedure that involves replacing damaged corneal tissue with healthy corneal tissue from a donor due to an irreversible visual impairment or corneal alteration that cannot be corrected otherwise. Corneal transplant surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures performed in the world.

Various diseases and injuries can affect the transparency and shape of the cornea, preventing light from passing through normally and causing impaired vision. Depending on which layer of the cornea is affected, it may be treated:

  • with penetrating keratoplasty,
  • deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK),
  • or endothelial keratoplasty.

The most common problems affecting the cornea include keratoconus (is a disease in which the cornea thins and becomes progressively more pointed. This generates pronounced irregular astigmatism), corneal ulcers or endothelial pathology.

Substantiated information by:

Gloria Ferrer
Jorge Peraza Nieves

Published: 27 November 2019
Updated: 27 November 2019

Subscribe

Receive the latest updates related to this content.

Thank you for subscribing!

If this is the first time you subscribe you will receive a confirmation email, check your inbox

An error occurred and we were unable to send your data, please try again later.